Many folks would like to see us back on the Moon and developing its resources.

Tuesday, March 01, 2005

Good evening.

This is being sent to the address which
is where I sent the test message a number of you responded to.
Sorry, thought I was sending it to myself, and thanks for responding.
Since you seemed to get the message - :-) - I will post this bit of
information to that address.

I also sent a post a bit earlier to the old address
which I hope you also got. Both messages are
in the new archive.
To see the collection of prior postings to the list, visit the
lunar-update Archives .

Some have wondered if you could talk to the astronauts on the ISS and I
know high school students have arranged to do. Sat in on one of those
sessions that was held at Ames. The announcement below is more for the
media and is for tomorrow so a short fuse. The information about
Astronaut Steve Robinson may be of interest.

Will also copy the Shuttle Processing Report just to let you know that
NASA is on track for a launch between May 15 - June 3, 2005.

It is something to look up for, even if not that far up.

Larry Kellogg

Allard Beutel
Headquarters, Washington Feb. 28, 2005
(Phone 202/358-4769)

James Hartsfield
Johnson Space Center, Houston
(Phone 281/483-5111)



Astronaut Steve Robinson is available for interviews via satellite from 8:45 to 10:45 a.m. EST Tuesday, March 1. He is a member of the first Space Shuttle mission (STS-114) since the Columbia accident.

Media interested in interviewing Robinson must contact Stephanie Zeluck at the Johnson Space Center media office at: 281/ 483-9071; or page her at: 713/508-0581.

The Sacramento, Calif., native is a mission specialist and veteran of two previous Space Shuttle flights. He will participate in three spacewalks during Shuttle Discovery's 12-day mission this spring. He will team with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi to test new methods for Shuttle Thermal Protection System repair, replace a failed Space Station gyroscope and install new equipment. For information about Robinson, visit:

Video highlights of STS-114 crew training air on NASA TV beginning at 8:15 a.m. EST tomorrow. NASA TV is available via satellite in the continental U.S. on AMC-6, Transponder 9C, C-Band, at 72 degrees west longitude. The frequency is 3880.0 MHz. Polarization is vertical, and audio is monaural at 6.80 MHz; in Alaska and Hawaii, AMC-7, Transponder 18C, C-Band, at 137 degrees west longitude. The frequency is 4060.0 MHz. Polarization is vertical, and audio is monaural at 6.80 MHz. NASA TV is also broadcast live on the Internet:

For information about NASA's Return to Flight efforts and the STS-114 mission, visit:

* * *

NASA press releases and other information are available automatically
by sending an Internet electronic mail message to
In the body of the message (not the subject line) users should type
the words "subscribe press-release" (no quotes). The system will
reply with a confirmation via E-mail of each subscription. A second
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NASA releases also are available via CompuServe using the command


Allard Beutel/Melissa Mathews
Headquarters, Washington Feb. 28, 2005
(Phone: 202/358-4769/1272)

Jessica Rye
Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
(Phone: 321/867-2468)


The Space Shuttle fleet is housed and processed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Fla. The order the Space Shuttles are listed does not necessarily reflect chronological order of future missions.

Discovery (OV-103)

Mission: STS-114 - 17th ISS Flight (LF1) - Multi-Purpose Logistics Module
Vehicle: Discovery (OV-103)
Location: Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 3
Launch Date: Launch Planning Window May 15 - June 3, 2005
Launch Pad: 39B
Crew: Collins, Kelly, Noguchi, Robinson, Thomas, Lawrence and Camarda
Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

In Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, orbiter system testing is 96 percent complete on Discovery for its mission, designated STS-114, to the International Space Station. Final work and closeouts are progressing well in preparation for Discovery's roll over to the Vehicle Assembly Building in mid-March.
The payload bay doors are scheduled to be closed today for installation of a few remaining door-hinge carrier panels. The payload bay doors will then be opened to verify correct placement of the carrier panels. When completed, the payload bay doors will be closed for the final time for flight. Work continues on seal installation on the main and nose landing-gear doors; then followed by functional tests to ensure the proper compression of the doors.

In the Vehicle Assembly Building, paint and cork repairs are complete on the Solid Rocket Boosters' (SRBs) aft inactive stub ring, an attach ring surrounding the booster located about 10 feet below the External Tank (ET) attach point. The ET is scheduled to be moved from the checkout cell to the integration cell and mated to the twin SRBs on Monday.

Atlantis (OV-104)

Mission: STS-121 - 18th ISS Flight (ULF1) - Multi-Purpose Logistics Module/Crew Rotation
Vehicle: Atlantis (OV-104)
Location: Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 1
Launch Date: Launch Planning Window July 12 - July 31, 2005
Launch Pad: 39B
Crew: Lindsey, Kelly, Sellers, Fossum, Nowak and Wilson
Inclination/Orbit Altitude: 51.6 degrees/122 nautical miles

Technicians continue to process Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 1 for its mission, designated STS-121, to the International Space Station. Powered-up system testing continues with water coolant loop No. 1 servicing and No. 2 de-servicing, fuel cell leak checks, as well as Global Positioning System and orbiter docking system testing.

The Remote Manipulator System, or Space Shuttle arm, was delivered to the bay Thursday for installation into Atlantis' payload bay this weekend. The Forward Reaction Control System was installed on the vehicle Monday. Work continues on bolt installations. Rudder Speed Brake installation is nearly complete, while seal installation and Thermal Protection System blanket bonding on the vertical stabilizer is ongoing.

Endeavour (OV-105)

On Tuesday, orbiter Endeavour moved from the OPF to the Florida Space Authority's Reusable Launch Vehicle hangar at KSC. While in the hangar, Endeavour will be tested to see how orbiters respond to a new radar system that will be used to detect debris during launch. In the OPF, work includes modifications to the bay and platform validation. Endeavour will remain in the hangar for approximately 30 days, then return to the OPF.

Previous Space Shuttle processing status reports are available on the Internet at:


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( Please send suggestions for postings
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